Sen. Dale Zorn scores perfect voting record in 2019

LANSING, Mich. — The Michigan Senate recorded 370 roll call votes in 2019, and Sen. Dale Zorn made sure to cast a vote on every single one of them.

“It is an honor and a privilege to serve on behalf of the hardworking people of Monroe and Lenawee counties — which starts with being at work each session day to be their voice in the Senate,” said Zorn, R-Ida. “I take the responsibility that has been entrusted in me seriously, and I am proud to have never missed a vote.”

Zorn has not missed any of 3,482 roll call votes during his time in the state Senate. He also had perfect voting records all four years of his service in the House of Representatives from 2011 through 2014.

In total, Zorn has not missed a single vote of 6,344 roll call votes during his nine years in the Legislature.

“As the men and women of Michigan’s 17th Senate District go to work each day, I believe they deserve the same dedication from their elected officials,” Zorn said.

A full recording of missed votes is available at www.MichiganVotes.org/MissedVotes.aspx.

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Trooper Adams memorial highway bill approved by Senate

LANSING, Mich. — The Michigan Senate on Wednesday unanimously approved Sen. Dale Zorn’s legislation to honor Trooper Rodger Adams, who was the 25th Michigan State Police officer to die in the line of duty.

“Our state troopers and local law enforcement officers risk their lives every day to keep us safe, and we often take that for granted,” said Zorn, R-Ida. “This memorial highway would honor the life and death of Trooper Rodger Adams — a husband, veteran and dedicated officer who was tragically killed while serving and protecting the people of Michigan.”

On May 14, 1971, Adams was killed instantly when his patrol car was hit nearly head-on by an oncoming car on U.S. 12 near Tipton Highway as Adams and his partner were responding to a traffic crash shortly after 1 a.m.

Senate Bill 132 would designate a portion of U.S. 12 in Lenawee County from M-52 to the Monagan Highway as the “Trooper Rodger M. Adams Memorial Highway.”

Prior to Senate passage of the bill, former Lenawee County Commissioner Jim Driskill testified in support of the measure, which has been sent to the House of Representatives for consideration.

If the bill is signed into law, it will have no fiscal impact on the state or local government. State law requires sufficient private contributions to completely cover the cost of erecting and maintaining markers indicating the name of a memorial highway.

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Senate OKs Zorn bill to reduce opioid prescription abuse

LANSING, Mich. — The Michigan Senate on Wednesday unanimously approved Sen. Dale Zorn’s legislation to combat opioid abuse by requiring prescriptions for the drugs to be transmitted from the doctor to the pharmacy electronically.

“This reform is designed to help stop the state’s opioid abuse problem by reducing fraudulent availability of these highly addictive drugs,” said Zorn, R-Ida. “While improving overall patient safety and efficient access to necessary medications, requiring the use of electronic prescriptions would reduce the illegal supply of opioids through fraud and virtually eliminate ‘doctor shopping’ — where someone acquires drugs from several different doctors.”

Senate Bill 248, sponsored by Sen. Ruth Johnson, R-Holly, would require the electronic prescribing of prescription drugs in Michigan by Jan. 1, 2021. If a prescriber could not meet the electronic transmission requirements due to a technological limitation that was not reasonably within their control, they could apply for a waiver from the Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA).

Zorn’s bill, SB 254, would apply to prescriptions for controlled substances containing opioids or benzodiazepines.

Electronic prescribing, or e-prescribing, is the use of a technological system by prescribers to write and transmit a patient’s prescription to a participating pharmacy.

“We have seen the terrible impacts of the opioid epidemic in our state and our local communities,” Zorn said. “It’s time for Michigan to join other states with an e-prescribing requirement for controlled substances to help us stop abusers and drug dealers from using fraudulent prescriptions to get these dangerous drugs.”

According to a Senate Fiscal Agency analysis of the bills, at least 23 states require e-prescribing with certain exemptions.

SBs 248 and 254 now head to the House of Representatives for consideration.

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Lawmakers welcome Battle of the Bulge veterans

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Dale W. Zorn and Rep. Bronna Kahle on Thursday welcomed Michigan’s last two remaining survivors of the Battle of the Bulge to the Capitol, including Frank Dick of Lenawee County.

“In less than nine months, Frank Dick went from graduating from high school to being entrenched in one of the most famous battles of World War II,” said Zorn, R-Ida. “Frank has led a remarkable life and has continued to build upon his service and leadership as a civilian. Next week, he will travel to Belgium and Luxembourg as part of an event to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge. It is an honor to have him here to show our appreciation for his service.”

After his high school graduation, Dick enlisted in the U.S. Army and began basic training on June 6, 1944.

By mid-December, he was oversees serving as a replacement in Gen. Patton’s Third Army, 80th Division, 317th Infantry Regiment, Company I — famously known as the Blue Ridge Mountain Boys. His involvement in the division made him a participant in the Battle of the Bulge, the last major German offensive campaign on the Western Front.

On Feb. 19, 1945, Dick was injured by incoming mortar fire, suffering a 100% disability. He was honorably discharged in 1946 and was awarded the Purple Heart, Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, and Combat Infantry Badge, among others.

“Those who have served our great nation deserve our respect and recognition for their sacrifices,” said Kahle, R-Adrian. “Frank’s incredible desire to serve is acknowledged through his time as a soldier in World War II and as he continued to give back to those around him after returning home. It was an honor to have the opportunity to recognize Frank at the Capitol and thank him for his service on behalf of the state of Michigan.”

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Editor’s note: The above photograph is available by clicking on the image or by visiting Zorn’s website at: www.SenatorDaleZorn.com/Photowire.

Photo caption: Sen. Dale W. Zorn, R-Ida, and Rep. Bronna Kahle, R-Adrian, welcome Frank Dick (center left) of Lenawee County to the Michigan Capitol. Dick is one of Michigan’s last two remaining survivors of the Battle of the Bulge. Victor Cross (center right) of Genesee County is the other remaining survivor and was the guest of Sen. Jim Ananich, D-Flint, and Rep. Sheryl Kennedy, D-Davison.

**Photo Advisory** Panel OKs Zorn’s Trooper Adams memorial highway bill

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Dale Zorn, R-Ida, and former Lenawee County Commissioner Jim Driskill testified on Wednesday about Zorn’s legislation to honor Trooper Rodger Adams, who was the 25th Michigan State Police officer to die in the line of duty.

On May 14, 1971, Adams was killed instantly when his patrol car was hit nearly head-on by an oncoming car on U.S. 12 near Tipton Highway as Adams and his partner were responding to a traffic crash shortly after 1 a.m.

Senate Bill 132 would designate a portion of U.S. 12 in Lenawee County from M-52 to the Monagan Highway as the “Trooper Rodger M. Adams Memorial Highway.”

The Senate Transportation and Infrastructure Committee approved the bill, which now heads to the full Senate for consideration.

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Editor’s note: The above photograph is available by clicking on the image or by visiting www.SenatorDaleZorn.com/Photowire.

Zorn supports restoring many of governor’s budget cuts

LANSING, Mich. — Sen. Dale Zorn on Wednesday voted to restore more than $570 million of the fiscal year 2020 budget vetoes and transfers made by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

“Due to the governor’s games, the state budget is now in overtime with the Michigan people hopeful for a positive result,” said Zorn, R-Ida. “I supported this partial restoration of the governor’s cuts and transfers because this funding is critically needed by our local governments, students, veterans, vulnerable children and more. It’s not everything we need, but it’s a start to restoring a responsible budget for all Michigan residents.”

After signing the state budget, the governor issued a historic 147 line-item vetoes to cut nearly $950 million in funding approved by the Legislature. She then used an administrative board to transfer $625 million in additional funding.

Senate Bills 376 and 377 would restore a total of $573.5 million of the governor’s vetoed funding and administrative funding transfers, including $38 million for the Michigan Tuition Grant program, $1.6 million for autism, $4 million in county veterans services, $13 million for county sheriff secondary road patrols, $14.8 million for county jail reimbursements, and $35 million to restore the per-pupil increase for public charter schools.

“I was very disappointed with the governor’s budget actions. They were wrong and set a terrible precedent,” Zorn said. “Her cuts hurt real people. I support restoring this important funding, but I will also work on a solution to ensure that Michigan families are not leveraged again for political gain.”

If left unrestored, the governor’s cuts will mean nearly 900 Siena Heights University students and almost 700 Adrian College students would lose their tuition grant. The governor’s cuts to county sheriff secondary road patrols would cost Lenawee County $103,000 and Monroe County $147,305 — forcing the elimination of patrol positions — and the cuts to the County Jail Reimbursement Program would cost Monroe County $160,000 and Lenawee County $27,000.

The bills have been sent to the House of Representatives for consideration.

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